Life as I know it...


instagram:

Touring Africa with the Obamas

Want to see more photos of the Obamas’ trip to Africa? Follow @whitehouse and @michelleobama, as well as reporters @arishapiro and @evanvucci.

This week, the White House and First Lady Michelle launched their Instagram accounts—@whitehouse and @michelleobama—just in time to document their tour of Africa, which kicked off with a visit to the west African country of Senegal. Both the White House and the First Lady have been documenting their trip on Instagram, sharing photos and videos with the #ObamaInAfrica and #FLOTUSinAfrica hashtags.

Reporters have also been documenting the trip, among them:

Follow along as the President continues his tour in South Africa and Tanzania.

(via ari-abroad)

— 1 year ago with 975 notes
"DOMA singles out a class of persons deemed by a State entitled to recognition and protection to enhance their own liberty."
The majority opinion in the Supreme Court’s ruling on the Defense of Marriage Act. SCOTUS has decided DOMA is unconstitutional. Read more at NPR’s The Two-Way. (via npr)
— 1 year ago with 1737 notes
breakingnews:

Supreme Court: Defense of Marriage Act is unconstitutional
NBC News: The United States Supreme Court has ruled 5-4 that the federal Defense of Marriage Act is unconstitutional
For more on this story including the decision on Proposition 8 visit breakingnews.com 
Photo: Gay marriage supporter Vin Testa waves a rainbow flag in anticipation of U.S. Supreme Court rulings (REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst)

breakingnews:

Supreme Court: Defense of Marriage Act is unconstitutional

NBC News: The United States Supreme Court has ruled 5-4 that the federal Defense of Marriage Act is unconstitutional

For more on this story including the decision on Proposition 8 visit breakingnews.com

Photo: Gay marriage supporter Vin Testa waves a rainbow flag in anticipation of U.S. Supreme Court rulings (REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst)

— 1 year ago with 1182 notes
breakingnews:

Texas abortion bill misses deadline
USA Today: A vote on a Texas bill that would severely curtail abortion rights in the state descended into chaos in the early hours of Wednesday morning as lawmakers said the final vote missed a midnight deadline.
Texas Lt. Gov. David Dewhurst said Republicans missed their deadline to pass new abortion restrictions after protesters screamed down lawmakers as the final 15 minutes passed before the special legislative session’s deadline. Dewhurst said on Wednesday morning that the abortion bill did not pass.
Photo: Sen. Wendy Davis, D-Fort Worth, speaks as she begins a filibuster in an effort to kill an abortion bill on June 25 in Austin, Texas. (Eric Gay/AP)

breakingnews:

Texas abortion bill misses deadline

USA Today: A vote on a Texas bill that would severely curtail abortion rights in the state descended into chaos in the early hours of Wednesday morning as lawmakers said the final vote missed a midnight deadline.

Texas Lt. Gov. David Dewhurst said Republicans missed their deadline to pass new abortion restrictions after protesters screamed down lawmakers as the final 15 minutes passed before the special legislative session’s deadline. Dewhurst said on Wednesday morning that the abortion bill did not pass.

Photo: Sen. Wendy Davis, D-Fort Worth, speaks as she begins a filibuster in an effort to kill an abortion bill on June 25 in Austin, Texas. (Eric Gay/AP)

— 1 year ago with 3535 notes
ourpresidents:

50 years ago - JFK in Berlin 
On June 26, 1963, John F. Kennedy stood at Rudolph Wilde Platz (now John F. Kennedy Platz) in West Berlin to deliver one of his most well-known speeches. His visit to the divided city followed appearances across Germany, from Bonn to Cologne, to Frankfurt. In Berlin, 120,000 people gathered to listen to President Kennedy deliver his remarks: 

“Freedom is indivisible and when one man is enslaved, all are not free. When all are free, then we can look forward to that day when this city will be joined as one and this country and this great Continent of Europe in a peaceful and hopeful globe…
All free men, wherever they may live, are Citizens of Berlin, and, therefore, as a free man, I take pride in the words ‘Ich bin ein Berliner’”

Read more about the Cold War in Berlin
From the JFK Library

ourpresidents:

50 years ago - JFK in Berlin 

On June 26, 1963, John F. Kennedy stood at Rudolph Wilde Platz (now John F. Kennedy Platz) in West Berlin to deliver one of his most well-known speeches. His visit to the divided city followed appearances across Germany, from Bonn to Cologne, to Frankfurt. In Berlin, 120,000 people gathered to listen to President Kennedy deliver his remarks: 

“Freedom is indivisible and when one man is enslaved, all are not free. When all are free, then we can look forward to that day when this city will be joined as one and this country and this great Continent of Europe in a peaceful and hopeful globe…

All free men, wherever they may live, are Citizens of Berlin, and, therefore, as a free man, I take pride in the words ‘Ich bin ein Berliner’”

Read more about the Cold War in Berlin

From the JFK Library

— 1 year ago with 497 notes
todaysdocument:

“Ich bin ein Berliner”

President John F. Kennedy’s Remarks at the Berlin Rathaus Reading Cards June 26, 1963

50 years ago on June 26, 1963, President John F. Kennedy delivered one of his most memorable speeches that electrified an adoring crowd gathered in the shadow of the Berlin Wall. Almost 2 years after the construction of the Berlin Wall and 15 years after the Berlin Airlift, Kennedy paid tribute to the spirit of Berliners with his pronouncement of solidarity: “Ich bin ein Berliner” (I am a Berliner).
Although Kennedy deviated from his notes and improvised much of his speech, he spelled out his pivotal phrase phonetically on this note card.

todaysdocument:

“Ich bin ein Berliner”

President John F. Kennedy’s Remarks at the Berlin Rathaus Reading Cards June 26, 1963

50 years ago on June 26, 1963, President John F. Kennedy delivered one of his most memorable speeches that electrified an adoring crowd gathered in the shadow of the Berlin Wall. Almost 2 years after the construction of the Berlin Wall and 15 years after the Berlin Airlift, Kennedy paid tribute to the spirit of Berliners with his pronouncement of solidarity: “Ich bin ein Berliner” (I am a Berliner).

Although Kennedy deviated from his notes and improvised much of his speech, he spelled out his pivotal phrase phonetically on this note card.

— 1 year ago with 137 notes
pbsthisdayinhistory:


June 26, 1948: U.S. Begins the Berlin Airlift
On this day in 1948, U.S and allied forces began to deliver food and supplies to Berlin by airplane. After the Soviet Union barricaded all land and sea entrances into the city of Berlin, the United States began to drop supplies by airplane. In total, nearly 1,500 tons of supplies were needed daily for the nearly 2 million people in the city. Within weeks, allied forces were delivering an average of 2,500 tons of supplies into the city daily.
Read more about the events leading to the Berlin Airlift. 
Photo: Berliners watching a C-54 land at Berlin Tempelhof Airport, 1948 (United States Air Force Historical Research Agency via Cees Steijger). 

pbsthisdayinhistory:

June 26, 1948: U.S. Begins the Berlin Airlift

On this day in 1948, U.S and allied forces began to deliver food and supplies to Berlin by airplane. After the Soviet Union barricaded all land and sea entrances into the city of Berlin, the United States began to drop supplies by airplane. In total, nearly 1,500 tons of supplies were needed daily for the nearly 2 million people in the city. Within weeks, allied forces were delivering an average of 2,500 tons of supplies into the city daily.

Read more about the events leading to the Berlin Airlift

Photo: Berliners watching a C-54 land at Berlin Tempelhof Airport, 1948 (United States Air Force Historical Research Agency via Cees Steijger). 

— 1 year ago with 255 notes